Photography Honors

2D Art Honors – Creative Photography

Students explore the aesthetic foundations of art making using beginning photography techniques. This course may include, but is not limited to, color and/or black and white photography via digital media and/or traditional photography. Students become familiar with the basic mechanics of a camera, including lens and shutter operation, compositional foundations, printing an image for display, and evaluating a successful print. Student photographers may use a variety of media and materials, such as 35mm black and white film, single lens reflex camera, digital camera, darkroom, computer application, filters, various papers, digital output, photogram, cyanotypes, Sabatier effect, and pinhole photography. Craftsmanship and quality are reflected in the surface of the prints and the care of the materials. Photographers use an art criticism process to evaluate, explain, and measure artistic growth in personal or group works.
Students lead a focused investigation of a subject matter from ideation to completion. Students select a theme, develop a concept, and prepare the work for public viewing, portfolio, distribution, and/or exhibit. This course may include, but is not limited to, research, collaboration, installation, history of photography, making connections to contemporary and community photographers, and critiquing with varied techniques.

Processes, techniques, and media may include, but are not limited to, video, film, high speed photography, studio lighting, flash, long exposure, formal portraiture, large format, HDR, RAW processing, and digital output on a variety of media, including non-traditional materials. Craftsmanship and quality are reflected in the surface of the print, care of the materials, attention to compositional conventions, the display setting, and expression of ideas and feelings. Photographers use an art criticism process to evaluate, explain, and measure artistic growth in personal or group works. This course incorporates hands-on activities and consumption of art materials.

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note:

Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work. Through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted, students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning.

Susan Irene Johnson Email: sijohnson@pky.ufl.edu Phone: 352.392.1554 x296